Welcome to San Diego Blog | March 21, 2017

Modern Loft Design meets Historic San Diego

Worlds collide in our newest listing at ICON, located in the Ballpark District of Downtown San Diego’s East Village Neighborhood.  A rare and unique blend of modern design in an open loft floorplan, complimented with the historic windows of the old Carnation Dairy Factory,  highlights our latest listing at the popular ICON Community.  

Residence #331 at ICON. Boasting the Historic Windows of the Carnation Qualitee Dairy Factory

Residence #331 at ICON. Boasting the Historic Windows of the Carnation Qualitee Dairy Factory

Boasting character from its historic windows and soaring ceilings, Residence #331 at ICON combines  the past with contemporary urban sophistication.  Concrete walls, exposed ducts, and stainless appliances accent the industrial design, complimented with beautiful wood floors spanning the spacious living area and kitchen.  The bedroom area has an open appeal, thoughtfully separated by an elevated bedroom with all the creature comforts of today’s modern homes.

The Historic windows at ICON tell a story of the neighborhood, long before it was branded the East Village name.

San Diego: Carnation Milk Processing Plant. Re-incarnation to mixed-use lofts & artists complex in 1997 by Wayne Buss.

San Diego: Carnation Milk Processing Plant. Re-incarnation to mixed-use lofts & artists complex in 1997 by Wayne Buss.

Many years before the East Village Neighborhood existed, old warehouses and factories lined what was called Center City East.  One of the more prominent buildings in the neighborhood with historic significance  was the Carnation Dairy Factory, which opened in 1927 and produced milk, ice cream, and other dairy products.  The dairy ceased operations in the 1970s, and the building was virtually abandoned.

The building was purchased in the mid 1990’s by an inspired young architect named Wayne Buss, who created second floor loft spaces with the vision of a new neighborhood alive with art & culture.  Wayne Buss was inspired by the cultural diversity of the Lower East Side of Manhattan, and wanted to create a vintage mixed-use warehouse space that embraced the cultural diversity of some of the great urban cities that cultivated his inspiration.  Mr. Buss was an advocate for the neighborhood, and it is rumored that he actually penned the name East Village.  He proudly called his mixed use building, the ReinCarnation Project.  In December of 2004,  Wayne Buss’s life tragically ended in a car accident in New Zealand,  but his legacy lives on through the Carnation building and the lofts that reside within.

The Icon Community began its journey back in 2004, with the opening of Petco Park.  The new baseball park brought new life to the run down warehouses in the area, and developers started to move in.  Located on a prime corner of 10th and J street, the ReinCarnation Project was destined for a greater vision than its original concept.  The developers Levin Menzies were inspired by Mr. Buss’s vision and incorporated four new buildings into the historic Carnation Building, adapting it to its current state, but keeping its historic integrity intact.

ICON-San Diego- View from 11th Ave

ICON-San Diego- View from 11th Ave

Comprising of 4 Buildings and 327 total units on an entire super block of 10th/ J st, K St, and 11th avenue, The ICON Community has become one of the most sought after residential buildings in all of downtown today.  With only a small handful of the Carnation Lofts being offered at ICON, these homes offer a deviation from the norm, with an artistic sophistication that would have made Mr. Buss proud.

For more detailed information about Residence #331 at ICON, click the link.  To Schedule a showing for this wonderful property, contact 619-356-3099.


Written by: admin

Categories: Culture, East Village, East Village Real Estate, lofts

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